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Overall cargo down 4 percent at LAX

By Hpanchal on August 26, 2011

It's been a rough six months for air cargo at Los Angeles International Airport. But at a time where total cargo numbers around the world are down, LAX is only experiencing a modest decrease.

In first six months of the year, handlers at LAX saw a 14.35-percent, year-over-year increase in the amount of mail coming though the airport. Even with this boost, however, overall cargo numbers dropped 4.11 percent when compared to the same time frame last year due to sluggish airfreight numbers.

Year-to-date, officials saw 1.02 million tonnes of airfreight — the slim majority in international tonnage — and 45,764 tonnes of mostly domestic airmail.

July's totals continued a downward trend for the airport. Mail was down year-over-year by 0.9 percent, and airfreight dropped 7.30 percent. March had the biggest growth so far this year, with total cargo experiencing a 5.75-percent, year-over-year increase. Mail tonnage shot up 29.25 percent that month, with airfreight showing a 4.96-percent, year-over-year increase.

FedEx remained atop the leaderboard as the busiest airfreight carrier at LAX, moving 205,096 tonnes domestically during the first six months of the year, good for just more than 20 percent of the market. The top international carrier, Korean Airlines, handled 51,885 tonnes, or 5.07 percent of the market, during the same time period. Polar Air Cargo, Asiana Airlines and American Airlines rounded out the top five.

United Airlines and Delta Air Lines are LAX's top two airmail carriers so far this year, accounting for 22.15 percent and 15.17 percent of the market, respectively. Continental Airlines, which saw all of its 5,080 tonnes in domestic activity, came in third at 11.1 percent of the market. Air France is one of LAX's least active carriers, only flying 841 tonnes of international mail to the airport since January.

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