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FedEx boosts emission-reduction goals

By Hpanchal on August 21, 2012

FedEx detailed plans to increase its carbon-reduction targets for 2020 by 50 percent in its newly released Global Citizenship Report. Instead of the 20-percent reduction in carbon intensity FedEx announced in 2008, the U.S.-based integrator plans to slash carbon emissions by 30 percent from its 2005 totals by 2020.

FedEx is well on its way to hit these targets, according to a press release. By the end of fiscal-year 2011, the company effectively curbed aircraft emissions by 13.8 percent and boosted vehicle fuel efficiency by 16.6 percent. FedEx officials hope the June retirements of 18 fuel-inefficient Airbus A310-200s and six Boeing MD10-10s from the company’s U.S. Express fleet will improve these figures even more.

Last month, FedEx revealed that it will replace these retired aircraft with 19 Boeing 767-300s. The 767-300s, which boast greater fuel efficiency, will be delivered to the integrator between fiscal-year 2015 and fiscal-year 2019.

FedEx is also looking to grow its fleet with 757 aircraft, according to the Global Citizenship Report. By 2015, FedEx Express will have substituted all of its Boeing 727s for more fuel-efficient 757 aircraft. Boeing 777F aircraft are also on FedEx’s radar, according to company’s sustainability report, since the aircraft offer greater payload capacity and emit 18-percent less carbon than the older-generation MD-11s.

The integrator also reiterated its commitment to obtaining at least 30 percent of its jet fuel from biofuels by 2030 in the Global Citizenship Report, a target FedEx previously announced.

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