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IAG Cargo announces new Johannesburg route for A380

Johannesburg is the third route for IAG Cargo’s new A380 superjumbo.

The A380, which begins flying to Johannesburg Feb. 12, 2014, will join the 747-400 that already serves the route.

South African rugby star Bryan Habana helped announce the route during an event for IAG Cargo. The city is a major exporter of flowers and fresh produce with IAG Cargo, so the precision temperature control facilities onboard the A380 will offer exporters another level of supply chain control.

“The introduction of the A380 to the African market is great news for us,” Steve Gunning, managing director IAG Cargo, said. “With Africa being one of the world's largest perishables exporters, anything that introduces greater cold chain management is a big win for our customers.”

IAG Cargo has optimized its A380 for belly-hold cargo by purchasing two additional ULD positions in the hold. IAG Cargo is also the first carrier in the world to receive an A380 with an improved maximum takeoff weight, 12 tonnes heavier than other A380s, allowing it to carry more cargo.

The aircraft, which is enabled with air conditioning in the forward hold and heating and ventilation in the rear hold, will be well-suited for the shipment of temperature-sensitive goods.

Comments

Submitted by GlueBall on

The article suggests that IAG (Int'l Airline Group consisting of British Airways & Iberia) Cargo division (IAG Cargo) had acquired its own, higher payload A380; whereas the A380 in fact is and will continue to be a British Airways operated PASSENGER jet (Iberia has none) with only extra belly space allocated for freight. For the casual reader, the article is written as if this A380 were a dedicated freighter.

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